As health systems struggle to standardize care, inaccuracy is one of the biggest areas of concern.

Standardization can be tough. According to the US Advisory Board, most health systems today find standardization across a network of sites challenging.1
If this isn’t addressed, it can leave health systems at serious risk.

 

16

Percentage of Americans at risk for errors in BP measurement of +/- 5 mmHg, leaving them vulnerable to the effects of missed diagnoses and misdiagnoses, including adverse drug reactions and increased risk of stroke or heart attack2

30

Number of Americans who would be affected by overestimating true baseline BP by 5 mmHg, leading to inappropriate treatment and unnecessary cost3

Annual costs to treat high BP in the US4
Click here to see more.

Patient Positioning Matters 

You may not realize how much patient positioning during BP capture can impact the accuracy of BP measurements. Many healthcare providers have admitted to not following AHA recommendations for more accurate BP measurement.5 Here’s what can happen if you are among those providers.

Hover over the blue dots to see how patient positioning can adversely affect blood pressure measurements.

















no-talking

Cuff Placed on
Bare Arm

The upper arm should be bare. Any clothing covering the cuff location should be removed. Placing the cuff over clothing can add 5 to 50 mmHg. Clothing covering the cuff location should not be rolled so as to not have a tourniquet affect above the
BP cuff.

no-talking
no-talking

Arm Supported at
Heart Height

The patient’s arm should be supported at heart level (the middle of the cuff on the upper arm should be at the level of the right atrium). An unsupported arm can add 6 to 10 mmHg to the measurement. If the arm is above heart level, the reading can be too low (-2 mmHg per inch). If the arm is below heart level, the reading can be too high (+2 mmHg per inch).

no-talking

Back Supported

The patient should be seated comfortably with the back supported. If the patient’s back is not properly supported, the measurement can be 5 to 15 mmHg too high.

no-talking

Legs Uncrossed

The patient should be seated comfortably with legs uncrossed. If the patient’s legs are crossed, the measurement can increase by 2 to 8 mmHg.

no-talking

Feet Flat on
the Floor

The patient should be seated comfortably with feet flat on the floor. If the patient’s feet are not flat on the floor, the measurement can increase 5 to 15 mmHg.

No Talking

Neither the patient nor the person taking the measurement should talk during the procedure. The patient talking or active listening can increase the measurement by 10 to 15 mmHg.

 

Cuff Placed on Bare Arm

The upper arm should be bare. Any clothing covering the cuff location should be removed. Placing the cuff over clothing can add 5 to 50 mmHg. Clothing covering the cuff location should not be rolled so as to not have a tourniquet affect above the BP cuff.  

 

Arm Supported at Heart Height

The patient’s arm should be supported at heart level (the middle of the cuff on the upper arm should be at the level of the right atrium). An unsupported arm can add 6 to 10 mmHg to the measurement. If the arm is above heart level, the reading can be too low (-2 mmHg per inch). If the arm is below heart level, the reading can be too high (+2 mmHg per inch).

 

Back Supported

The patient should be seated comfortably with the back supported. If the patient’s back is not properly supported, the measurement can be 5 to 15 mmHg too high.

 

Legs Uncrossed

The patient should be seated comfortably with legs uncrossed. If the patient’s legs are crossed, the measurement can increase by 2 to 8 mmHg.

 

Feet Flat on the Floor

The patient should be seated comfortably with feet flat on the floor. If the patient’s feet are not flat on the floor, the measurement can increase 5 to 15 mmHg.

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What is Inaccurate BP Costing You__ 2Snipit

What is Inaccurate BP Costing You__ 2Snipit

What is inaccurate BP costing you?

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Better BP is Better Care.

And it all starts at the point of care.

Heart disease and stroke are the number one killers of Americans today from disease. Hypertension is a contributing factor to both of these diseases.7 The impact to your patients can be immeasurable. We want to help you easily position patients for a better BP measurement—every patient, every time. That’s why we designed the only fully integrated point of care workflow to help promote proper patient positioning for a more accurate
blood pressure measurement.

 

Midmark 626 Barrier-Free® Exam Chair
with Digital Scale

The height-adjustable exam chair with a barrier-free low chair height allows the majority of patients (even females with heights in the 3rd percentile) to place their feet flat on the floor.8 Powered movement of the back section ensures the patient’s back is supported.

Patient Support Rails+

Easily support the patient’s arm with cuff at heart level using this exclusive chair accessory. The unique articulating arm pad design allows for more precise positioning for blood pressure capture or other similar applications.

Midmark® Digital Vital Signs Device

Connect the Midmark Digital Vital Signs Device to the 626 with integrated digital scale to capture all vital signs measurements (including weight) quickly and discreetly from the comfort of the exam chair. Then, import data to the EMR with the push of a button. The Midmark IQconnect® framework provides a seamless connection from your devices to the EMR. Operate all of your devices from one single pane of glass—the computer screen. Click here for more
vital signs workflows.  

 

 

blue-slant

Let’s design a better BP ecosystem today.
Contact a rep to get started.

 

Behind the Design

Better care doesn’t happen by chance—it happens by design. Explore the research behind our designs.